Central Kitchen Process

Central Kitchen Process

In a central kitchen, food moves through different pathways depending on the type of food. In principle, a kitchen manager must first determine the flow of food and the general layout of the food service operation can then be developed.  The operational layout helps minimize potential for cross contamination of food products. As rule of thumb the flow of food should move in one direction, do as little crossing paths as possible and move the shortest distances possible.

Ideally the incorporation of HACCP principles would be apparent by clearly separating various areas of food processing such as receiving, storage, food processing, equipment cleaning, and transportation. For example, the receiving area would be separated from other parts of the operation by doors. These doors would be closed to the outside to minimize physical hazards such as exhaust fumes and dirt. Ideally, delivery vehicles would be kept in an enclosed receiving area. Other examples of physical separation include: (1) Storage areas are often separated from preparation areas; (2) Dish and ware washing areas are in a separate room; (3) Refrigerated cooked products are in a separate area from raw ingredients.