Delivery Mothod

Deliver with pails

Stainless steels are widely used in food contact applications because of the corrosion resistance and their ability to be readily cleaned and sterilized.   There are over 200 types (grades) of stainless steel, but only about 100 types are in regular commercial production and fewer than 10 types account for the bulk of usage.

Many countreis post legislative requirements to food processing equipments.  In France, for instance, stainless steels for food contact products must contain at least 13% of chromium, and can contain nickel and manganese. Maximum limits are imposed for certain other alloying elements (4% for Mo, Ti, Al and Cu; 1% for Ta, Nb and Zr). In Italy, there is a “positive list” of stainless steel grades for food contact. These grades must pass tests for corrosion in distilled water, olive oil, an aqueous solution of ethanol and 3% acetic acid in water, under specified conditions.


Reference: Technical document, guidelines on metals and alloys used a food contact metalerials, Council of Durope

 

Deliver with pouches

The most common food containers used in cook-chill are the type made from durable plastic, which are oven proof and reusable after washing and sanitizing. When cook-chill foods are to be transported and served in bulk, the most desirable type of food grade container would be stainless steel trays with shallow sides, or gastronome containers.


Tips for Appropriate Handling:

  • Food containers should be adequately secured in transport vehicles so that they do not move around excessively. This can be achieved with the use of cargo nets, ropes or restraining belts.
  • Food items in trolley, trays or boxes should be handled and packed in such a way to ensure minimum breakage and damage occurs.
  • Food items and food containers, which are damaged, may promote bacterial growth. This may lead to poor hygiene conditions and customer complaints.
  • Monitoring and recording food temperatures


 

 

Reference: Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Education and Training Authority (THETA), 2003

 

Deliver with cans

Deliver with plastic cups